SAAP takes a new direction

At the Annual General Meeting of the Southern African Association for Pastoral Work (SAAP) it was decided that SAAP will cease to exist as an independent body and will amalgamate with the Association for Ministry Training Practitioners (AMTP) to form a new body, the Association of Christian Religious Practitioners (ACRP).

SAAP’s members consist of practitioners from a wide range of disciplines and areas of application, varying from lay pastoral workers, counsellors, chaplains, pastors, ministers and specialist counsellors to private practitioners, family and marriage counsellors, trauma counsellors and mediators.

ACRP will apply for SAQA accreditation to be recognised as a professional statutory body in accordance with the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) Act of 2008 ACRP.

 

It was decided that SAAP will cease to exist as an independent body and will amalgamate with the Association for Ministry Training Practitioners (AMTP) to form a new body, the Association of Christian Religious Practitioners (ACRP).

 

The statutory status will be different to that of the HPCSA and the SACSSP since the law requires a specific professional category (e.g. health workers or social workers) in order to register with any of these bodies.

Before legislation could be considered, parliament has to be convinced of the need of a body such as ACRP as well as a list of members. The formation of the new body would be a step in this direction.

The 2016 SAAP Conference with the theme “Healing as a Pastoral Challenge” was held on 4 and 5 March in Pretoria. The keynote speaker was Prof Wentzel Coetzer of North West University and workshops were presented by Dr Johan Dill, Prof Elijah Baloyi and Ms Mantoa Nzeku.

SAAP was established in 1991 with the aim to associate, affiliate and represent people who are interested in the study of, training in and responsible exercise of pastoral work in Southern Africa.